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Problems from Another Time

Individual problems from throughout mathematics history, as well as articles that include problem sets for students.

A man has four creditors. To the first he owes 624 ducats; to the second, 546; to the third, 492; and to the fourth 368.
Three vertical posts along a straight canal, each rising to the same height above the surface of the water. By using measurments of the posts, determine, to the nearest mile, the radius of the earth.
Determine the dimensions of the least isosceles triangle ACD that can circumscribe a given circle.
A ladder is placed perpendicular to the plane of the horizon, and in coincidence with the plane of an upright wall.
Suppose a person whose height is 5 feet 7 inches travels 10000 miles in the arc of a great circle. How much further will the person's head have gone compared to their feet, the circumference of the Earth being 21600 miles?
A horse, halving its speed each day, travels 700 miles in 7 days. How far does it travel each day?
The authors recount the 'great tale' of Napier's and Burgi's parallel development of logarithms and urge you to use it in class.
Determine a number having remainders 2, 3, and 2 when divided by 3, 5, and 7 respectively.
A man hired a horse in London at 3 pence a mile. He rode 94 miles due west to Bristol then due north to Chester, whence he returned toward London for 66 miles, which put him in Coventry.
As for a square piece of land that amounts to 100 square cubits, if it is said to you, "Cause it to make a piece of land that amounts to 100 square cubits that is round," what is the required diameter?

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